Six on Saturday 2nd March 2019

Good morning and welcome to this weeks Six on Saturday.

Well it’s official the weather has been barmy this week. Record temperatures and moorland and gorse fires at Saddleworth Moor and On Arthur’s Seat (poor chap!). Luckily the weather seems to have hit the factory reboot button and yesterday was lovely and damp. And the garden is looking better for it.

I am on call this weekend so this weeks blog will be short and sweet.

Here is my six.

1. Echerveria Elegans

I have put some of my hardier Echerverias back out in the open and they are starting reaping the benefits. I had to take a photo of this as the drizzle made it look sparkly. Of course we will probably have another cold spell soon so I will have to keep an eye on them. In fact we are forecast for rain this weekend so I might bring them in to protect them getting over wet and turning to mush. The photo does not do this plant justice as it is around a foot wide.

2. Sempervivum Mrs Giuseppe

I thought I had killed this plant last year and threw it in a corner of the garden. Imagine my delight when I tidied up the corner at the weekend and found this! Truly an ugly duckling plant. The green is like a light khaki green but with different coloured shades all along the leaf. I have around about 20 varieties that I know their names now. When I first started buying them I did not leave the labels beside them and I struggle to identify them. I have orders another 10 varieties easy for me to plant in a couple of troughs on my holiday at end of the month. I have potted a lot of the offsets of different varieties into pots and may start selling them, give them to friends and give a few to my local micro pin for table ornaments.

3. Lewisia Cotleydon

This plant is really looking healthy and by the looks of it it is going to burst with flowers. I left it in the pot it was in last year and made sure that any dead leaves were removed from it if any fell onto it from trees. The way it is going I might have to repost it this year.

4. Seedlings

I took the opportunity with the nice weather last weekend to pot on some seedling. Above we have Digitalis Camelot Cream and Aquilegis Salmon Rose. I like many people (Mr P especially) only keep 6 or 8 seedings to grow on as you soon run out of space if you keep all of them. Survival of the fittest springs to mind.

5. Primula Denticula

By the looks of it this is going to be a bumper year for primulas. However is it normal for the flower head to form before the leaves like this. Obviously the leaves will catch up but to me that looks a bit weird.

6. Semi Hardy Sedum cuttings.

I took these cuttings last year and they have remained dormant since then. They are starting to grow now. On the left we have Cremosedum Crocodile and on the Right we have Sedum Clavatum also known as Ticalatengo Gorge Sedum. Unfortunately the parent plant succumbed to the damp weather over the winter but hopefully this baby will last. Tiscalatengo Gorge is the valley in Mexico where this was first found but it is said to grow in other places in Mexico and California was . The 2 red Echerverias at the back are some sort of agovaides cross but are not very stable. If you look at them funny they start to rot.

Oh bonus while I was writing this blog I have just received my Dahlia Tubers. Bring on the beginning of April…

As always to find out how six on Saturday works please follow the following link The Propagator. The don of Six on Saturday.

That is my SOS.

26 Comments Add yours

  1. One Man And His Garden Trowel says:

    I tried to sow less last year so that I didn’t have to make those tough decisions as to which seedlings got selected! Didn’t work as when some seedlings died or got eaten there was less choice to plant out! Great sedum pics as always.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks…will try and make sure they don’t get eaten.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Right, if you are putting succulents out, then so am I!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I will tell you when I am putting them back in!

      Like

  3. That Lewisia is beautiful, even without the flowers! I used to grow Denticulata in Derbyshire very successfully but those that actually survive here are rather pathetic…… maybe this year will be different.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. fredgardener says:

    Your Lewisia is so far ahead of mine! You have an advantage because mine out and is in the ground … I am happy to see how it will bloom.
    Pretty photos Paul this week, as always .. and 1 foot wide this echerveria! it’s enormous!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Erm Fred it is not enormous…..embarrassed pause….it is only 7 inches. I am useless to when it comes to guessing dimensions.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. fredgardener says:

        I didn’t understand so 7 inches is rather …normal

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Too early for me to risk my succulents. You have done lovely ones

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Heyjude says:

    My succulents are staying indoors for a while longer, but the Sempervivum have survived the winter outdoors (most). The Lewisia is very attractive. I could be tempted 🙂

    Like

  7. tonytomeo says:

    I think that Lewisia cotyledon is native up north in the Siskiyous. I am not sure, and I doubt that the wild sort are comparable to garden varieties, but I think I remember that they grew wild somewhere up there.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes that is my understanding Tony. It is named after that famous expire Meriweather Lewis who discovered them when he headed west with Mr Clark

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Your Echerveria Elegans is a foot wide… I’, jealous. Minde is nowhere near that size. Curious, how old is your plant?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I may have exaggerated a bit but it is big. Will get the tape measure out.

      Like

    2. I feel a little embarrassed it is not a foot across it is only 7 inches. I am useless when it comes to guessing dimensions.

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      1. that’s still big! 🙂

        Like

  9. March Picker says:

    I’ll be eager to see which dahlias you’re adding this year. I am months away from planting… Do you pot them up early then transplant?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes will probably pot them up end of March when I am off for a week.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. The Lewisia is beautiful, but then so are the others. I was going to put my succulents outside the other day but chickened out

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Chloris says:

    What a great idea just keeping a few seedlings of each variety, it saves endless fiddly pricking out. I shall try that.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. cavershamjj says:

    Excellent seedling discipline. Gotta be cruel to be kind.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Your plants always look so big and happy!

    Liked by 1 person

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